University of Brighton

Third Year- Studio two

Social Climates of Dispute

BRIGHTmain

Over the next twenty years towns and cities will undergo considerable change, as will the technologies, social make-up and environmental conditions that influence their forms. Brighton’s work explores the dialogue between the existing built environment and emerging societal pressures arising from a set of distinct scenarios; some fantastic, some more subtle, but each proposing future social mechanisms and resulting built forms.

Working along a narrow strip from Brighton’s Pier to the South Downs to the city’s north, students evaluated the social and local dynamics of contested spaces charting wider trends, or stories, that have potential to lead to conflict in the future – both conflicts of interest and of physical and possibly violent action. In the analysis of these future societies, Brighton sought to remain positive and optimistic about the future. They identified what might be at the heart of local tensions, but also what makes communities work and cities function, rather than force people to resort to conflict. Future habitation and the notion of community is likely to alter, but as certain as there are problems there will be solutions.

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Studio Two

Five groups which take on five themes or scenarios around which proposals are based:
Consumerism
Immigration
Plugged-unplugged
Technology
Earthquake

These headings are deliberately intended to exploit current day concerns and advance them to a critical degree that could be felt in 20 years time. Our current demands for energy, our aspirations for greener technologies and continued affluence are drivers behind the projects.

What might be the business of the future city? What will power it? How will the built environment respond to supply and demand? What kind of lifestyle will characterize its inhabitants? Will it be all embracing? Or will groups be marginalized in the face of new pressures?

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Outputs describe graphically the resulting society, transactions and morphology which inhabit an element of the Brighton strip. Students work depicts infrastructure and systems that question how the future city subverts, stalls, isolates or connects and interogates traditional notions of utopias and dystopias. They each speculate how inhabitants will tailor and tweak their surroundings and adopt a cultural, climatic and material approach to design, generating experimental concepts for sustainable, user-oriented architectures.

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Tutors- Nick Hayhurst and Tamsie Thomson

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UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON

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